People wait in line to vote on the final day of early voting for the upcoming Nevada Democratic presidential caucus on Tuesday, February 18, in Henderson, Nevada.
People wait in line to vote on the final day of early voting for the upcoming Nevada Democratic presidential caucus on Tuesday, February 18, in Henderson, Nevada. Mario Tama/Getty Images

The early voting turnout in Nevada could be around 70,000 ballots, a Nevada Democratic Party aide tells CNN.

The party is still counting ballots from Tuesday, the final day of early voting, but the aide believes the final turnout for the day could be around 33,000 — nearly equivalent to the 36,000 ballots that were cast on the first three days of early voting.

Roughly 84,000 Nevadans participated in the 2016 caucuses, which had no early voting.

How early voting works: When a voter walks into an early voting site, they check in with an election volunteer who has a PDF voter roll pre-loaded onto an iPad. If a voter is not a registered Democrat, they will need to register with the party at that time.

The voter, after being given a pre-generated voter PIN, is asked to enter their information into a check-in form via Google.

The voter, once they begin the actual voting process, is then asked to rank either their candidates one to five in order of preference on a ballot.

That preference list is unique to caucuses and is done so that if the voter’s top choice does not reach viability in their caucus site on caucus day — that means they usually have 15% of the room supporting them — their support can go to their second or third choice. Voters can express support for up to five choices in ranked order. For example, if a voter who voted early puts former Vice President Joe Biden as their top choice but Biden is not viable in their caucus site on Saturday, their second choice will be counted upon realignment.

The voter, once finished, signs their ballot.