Syringes and vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine are prepared to be administered to front-line health care workers in Reno, Nevada, on December 17.
Syringes and vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine are prepared to be administered to front-line health care workers in Reno, Nevada, on December 17. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP/Getty Images

US Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams on Saturday encouraged the public to get educated about Covid-19 vaccines.

“We all have more information on these vaccines, at the point of administering them to the public, than we’ve had for any vaccine in history,” Adams said during a news conference hosted by Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine.

Adams said he got vaccinated publicly to help instill trust in Covid-19 vaccines.

“My arm feels fine. It’s a little bit sore, but no more sore than when I had the flu shot. I didn’t have any side effects at all,” Adams said, noting that it is normal for people to experience a low fever, headache or fatigue after receiving the vaccine.

Adams encouraged the public to seek out information about the vaccines.

“It’s okay to have questions. It’s okay to ask questions,” he said. “What is not okay is to let misinformation or mistrust cause you to make a decision which is going to be bad for your health, or your family’s health, or your community’s health.”

“This vaccine is almost 100% certain to prevent you or your loved one from getting severe disease,” Adams added. “It is the way we end this pandemic.”

A large effort: The US is leveraging every bit of authority and power it has to produce Covid-19 vaccines, Adams said. 

“I can tell you, with every degree of certainty from being on the Coronavirus Task Force, that we are doing everything we can to produce these vaccines as quickly as possible,” Adams said during a news conference hosted by Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine.

Adams said the US is on track to have 20 million vaccine doses by the end of December; 50 million by the end of January and 100 million by the end of February.

“That is half of the adult US population,” Adams noted.

He added that he’s more concerned about vaccine confidence than he is about vaccine supply.

“We’ve got to go from vaccines to vaccinations,” Adams said.